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Don’t Talk

This is what the Sun looks like when you filter out ALL the other frequencies

This is what the Sun looks like
when you filter out
ALL the other frequencies


There will be a spectacle. People act nuts at eclipses. Funny, but it underlines how these things affect us. Primal reflexes I guess. I saw one at Torrey Pines, CA, a few years ago. Those people were really weird. Costumes, bonfires, chants. Nebraskans won’t be quite so entertaining.

It will be interesting to see how Midwesterners handle this. There are those who will go about their normal routine, ignoring the fact that it becomes dark at midday.

Stay away from any lights that come on at dark, i.e. streetlights, advertising.

Take a thermometer, place it in the shade and note how the temperature drops during the event.

While the light level decreases as the partial phase progresses, your eyes will adapt and you’ll not notice it until a couple minutes before totality. Perhaps use an old fashion light meter or one that reads foot-candles, and note the lowering light level. At 50% obscuration your eyes won’t even notice it, but a light meter will.

You will notice an odd coloration change as less direct sunlight reaches you. Normally at low light levels, the colors are reddened (by sunset) but during an eclipse it darkens with no sunset. This has an unsettling effect on your sub conscience. Twilight, even darkness while the Sun is overhead. Your brain doesn’t know how to interpret that combination.

When your sunlight is emanating from just a tiny piece of the Sun, there is a sharpening of shadows, and there are tiny images of the Sun on the ground, beneath things like trees, as the light gets through the countless gaps in the obstructions.

Carry a cardboard, about 2 feet square, with a few holes near the middle, from a pinhole up to about 3/8″, and watch how they make images of the Sun on the ground as the partial phase advances. Maybe take a white sheet or tablecloth to project onto.

A few seconds prior to totality you may see “shadow bands” of light moving across the sheet. Wavy. It is a phenomenal thing, not fully understood. Probably an interference pattern.

There is so much going on. Don’t miss anything. Watch any wildlife. Watch other people.

Don’t spend a lot of effort trying to photograph this event, focus on the overall experience.

George KD0NME
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THE ECLIPSE HAPPENS MONDAY, 21 AUGUST, 1PM IN NEBRASKA.
IT’s A COUPLE HOURS DRIVE SOUTH OF OMAHA.
DON’T BE LATE.
START OUT AT 8AM.
THERE WILL BE CROWDS.
TELL YOUR EMPLOYER NOW.