Repeater List

In the beginning, (you know, He is one of us, a Zero) they only had repeaters on the upper half of the 2M band, from 146 – 148. It sort of grew out of former usage, .94 a popular simplex freq at first, and then repeaters with a minus 600kc offset. When it came to putting repeaters in the 147 Mc, they decided to go with a plus offset in case there might be some interference with services outside our band. (Individual’s Xmtrs are likely to be less well heard or lower power than a repeater, and thus less likely to cause out of band problems.)
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Then they decided to expand repeaters into the 145 Mc. (late 1970s) Thirty kc channels were first, and even today in this area we have both 15 & 20 kc channels represented in the 145 segment. (Look at the list below carefully.)
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But, you need some simplex channels in your radio also. Start with 146.43, .46, .49, and .52 continuing through .55, and .58. Then add some in the 147 Mc (from 147.42 at 30kc intervals) and listen around for other odd usage like ‘The Outlaw Channel’ 146.45; people on 146.50 even, and the rarely publicized Pottawattamie County Super Secret Simplex Freq of 147.495. (You won’t hear people calling on that freq, only a reference to “QSY to Secret Channel 9.”)
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Select from one of these repeater lists maintained by members and friends of SWIARC

 

Here are all the local repeaers in spreadsheet form compiled by Derek W0DBW of Plattsmouth NE.  This list is current.
EN21 Area Repeaters (updated monthly)

 

 

Here are all the local repeaters in a list compiled by Ed N0LJD of Bellevue NE.  This list is no longer maintained.
N0JLD Local Repeater List

 

Do you have a complete or reasonably complete list of local area repeaters, or a traveler’s repeater list that you would like to share?

If so, please let us know and we will post it here!